To overcome water shortage in Mumbai, BMC approves desal project
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To overcome water shortage in Mumbai, BMC approves desal project

BMC's standing committee gave an in principle approval for Rs 1600 crore desalination project aimed at meeting increasing demand of water for Mumbai.

Water Today

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BMC's standing committee Tuesday gave an in principle approval for Rs 1600 crore desalination project aimed at meeting increasing demand of water for Mumbai. Currently, Mumbai is supplied with water through seven different reservoirs some of them have been built since British times. Due to this project, sea water will be made potable for needs of Mumbai.

As water storage in these dams depends on the rainfall in that area. Due to global climate change, delays in the monsoon rains in the last few years have led to a 10 to 20 per cent water shortage in Mumbai. In contrast, the demand for water in the metropolis is constantly increasing.

Cost of the project

The civic body is planning to setup a desalination project with a capacity of 200 million liters per day. An eight acre government land has been identified at Manori near Malad in Mumbai. The estimated cost of setting up a project with a capacity of 200 million liters per day is around Rs. 1600 crore and the cost of operation and maintenance for 20 years is around Rs. 1920 crore.

BMC plans to set up the plant under the 'Swiss Challenge Method'. Under this, a project can be awarded to a private firm on an unsolicited proposal. M/s I.D.E. Water Technologies Ltd, a global expert in this field has submitted an unsolicited (self-suggested) proposal to the corporation.

This proposal was submitted in accordance with the Maharashtra State Government Act Maharashtra Infrastructure Development Enabling Authority Act 2018. The Act stipulates that if an unsolicited proposal is submitted, action will be taken against it. Following this, the corporation has decided to set up a decentralization project for Mumbai by inviting competitive tenders in the Swiss Challenge system.

Time required for the project

A detailed report on this project is expected to be prepared in 8 months and construction period is expected to be around 30 months. Once the project starts, about 4 units of electricity will be required per kiloliter of pure water. A five-member committee will be appointed under the chairmanship of the Municipal Commissioner. Additional Commissioner (Projects), Additional Commissioner (A), Deputy Commissioner (Special Engineering) will be the members of the committee. The chief engineer of the department concerned with the project will be the member secretary of the committee.

Land for the project

As the conservation cost of the project is directly related to the quality of seawater, a project is required for the project, which is close to the Mumbai coast but far from the creek. In view of this, about 12 hectares of government land under the jurisdiction of Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation has been identified at Manori. The Corporation is also in correspondence with the Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation regarding the transfer of this land.

Initially, 6 hectares of land will be required for this project and later up to 8 hectares for expansion. The project is likely to be expanded to a capacity of 400 million liters per day. M/s I.D.E. Water Technologies Ltd have been appointed as consultant for this project.

Disclaimer: This story has not been edited by Water Today staff and is generated from news feeds. Source: India Today

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